#science! (at Morrison Library)

#science! (at Morrison Library)

1 note

Watson and Crick.
And Meischer and Levene and Chargaff.

Watson and Crick.

And Meischer and Levene and Chargaff.

"… I’m charmed by the idea that when a school teacher writes her name on a blackboard on the first day of class, what she’s really doing is crushing the skeletons of terribly ancient earthlings into a form that spells out the name “Mrs. Guttenheimer.” Does she know?"

Thinking Too Much About Chalk (via npr)

(via npr)

594 notes

cystallineambermoments:

Joseph Maria Auchentaller

Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements - the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution and for life - weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way for them to get into your body is if those stars were kind enough to explode. They died so that you could be here today. 
— Laurence M. Krauss, 2009 

cystallineambermoments:

Joseph Maria Auchentaller

Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements - the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution and for life - weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way for them to get into your body is if those stars were kind enough to explode. They died so that you could be here today. 

— Laurence M. Krauss, 2009 

(via cystallineambermoments-deactiva)

143 notes

moshita:

How We Live or The Human Body and How to Take Care of It, 1884

humandress

(Source: moshita, via scientificillustration)

"I do not know much about writing rap lyrics, but I’m guessing that most rappers do not meet with physicists and cosmologists from MIT and Cornell before sitting down to write. But that’s exactly what Wu-Tang Clan founding member GZA did during the creation of his new album, Dark Matter — a project the rapper hopes will turn his audience on to science."

GZA and Neil deGrasse Tyson team up on a hip-hop record about science (via poptech)

this is the best. i am not even joking - this makes me feel better about humanity. 

(via ro-s-a-spark-s)

liquidnight:

Early testing of hydrogen filled balloons for radiosonde measurements. Theodolite used to track balloon to limit of visibility.
[From the NOAA Photo Library]

liquidnight:

Early testing of hydrogen filled balloons for radiosonde measurements.
Theodolite used to track balloon to limit of visibility.

[From the NOAA Photo Library]

um…awesome!!! Great representation and excellent detail. Love it. Thanks Shah!

the-star-stuff:

These Crazily Detailed Anatomical Images Are Made With Curled Paper

Called the Tissue Seriesartist Lisa Nilsson has constructed a range of anatomical cross sections of the human body using rolled pieces of Japanese mulberry paper. It’s a technique known as quilling, or paper filigree, and each piece takes weeks to assemble.

486 notes

seeinnovation:

A study shows that Design Squad,  an NSF-funded public television show about engineering, improves  children’s understanding of what engineers do, as well as children’s  skills in designing processes. Here, Design Squad season two cast members Leah and  Nick brainstorm ideas with host Nate Ball and discuss their cardboard  furniture design. Photo: Anthony Tieuli

seeinnovation:

A study shows that Design Squad, an NSF-funded public television show about engineering, improves children’s understanding of what engineers do, as well as children’s skills in designing processes. Here, Design Squad season two cast members Leah and Nick brainstorm ideas with host Nate Ball and discuss their cardboard furniture design. Photo: Anthony Tieuli

(via nationalsciencefoundation)