soupsoup:

Taking a nap on the porch (Taken with Instagram at Sullivan Street Porch)

soupsoup:

Taking a nap on the porch (Taken with Instagram at Sullivan Street Porch)

104 notes

good:

Brownwashing: Why Green Consumers Buy Brown Things
Dunkin’ Donuts, Cinnabon, and Target are swapping their white napkins for brown ones. Seventh Generation even dyes its translucent diapers brown. But does “brown” necessarily mean “eco-friendly?”—or are marketers messing with our minds? 
Read more on GOOD→ 

good:

Brownwashing: Why Green Consumers Buy Brown Things

Dunkin’ Donuts, Cinnabon, and Target are swapping their white napkins for brown ones. Seventh Generation even dyes its translucent diapers brown. But does “brown” necessarily mean “eco-friendly?”—or are marketers messing with our minds? 

Read more on GOOD→ 

86 notes

sabino:

by shissledissle

sabino:

by shissledissle

1,740 notes

shizumataka:

 
THIS AWESOME URN WILL TURN YOU INTO A TREE AFTER YOU DIE
BigThink:

You don’t find many designers working in the funeral business thinking about more creative ways for you to leave this world (and maybe they should be). However, Spanish designer Martin Azua has combined the romantic notion of life after death with an eco solution to the dirty business of the actual, you know, transition.
His Bios Urn is a biodegradable urn made from coconut shell, compacted peat and cellulose and inside it contains the seed of a tree. Once your remains have been placed into the urn, it can be planted and then the seed germinates and begins to grow. You even have the choice to pick the type of plant you would like to become, depending on what kind of planting space you prefer. 

(via This Awesome Urn Will Turn You into a Tree After You Die | Design for Good | Big Think)


I. Love. This.

shizumataka:

THIS AWESOME URN WILL TURN YOU INTO A TREE AFTER YOU DIE

BigThink:

You don’t find many designers working in the funeral business thinking about more creative ways for you to leave this world (and maybe they should be). However, Spanish designer Martin Azua has combined the romantic notion of life after death with an eco solution to the dirty business of the actual, you know, transition.

His Bios Urn is a biodegradable urn made from coconut shell, compacted peat and cellulose and inside it contains the seed of a tree. Once your remains have been placed into the urn, it can be planted and then the seed germinates and begins to grow. You even have the choice to pick the type of plant you would like to become, depending on what kind of planting space you prefer. 

(via This Awesome Urn Will Turn You into a Tree After You Die | Design for Good | Big Think)

I. Love. This.

(via loveyourchaos)

5,717 notes

GPOY - purifying avocado&oatmeal mud mask plus USMLE World question bank edition.

what are YOU doing with your Saturday morning? 

15 notes

officerofmonkeyproblems:

Aurora Borealis as seen from the International Space Station


This just blew my mind. I love nature. & space.

officerofmonkeyproblems:

Aurora Borealis as seen from the International Space Station

This just blew my mind.

I love nature.
& space.

(via loveyourchaos)

1,144 notes

(Source: sabino)

55 notes

loveyourchaos:

(by noceans)

loveyourchaos:

(by noceans)

215 notes

scipsy:

In this natural-color image from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas  swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, and green, the abstract art of the  natural world. The colors were painted by a massive phytoplankton  bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing  in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every  August in the Barents Sea.
The variations in color are caused by different species and  concentrations of phytoplankton. The bright blue colors are probably  from coccolithophores, a type of phytoplankton that is coated in a  chalky shell that reflects light, turning the ocean a milky turquoise.  Coccolithophores dominate the Barents Sea in August. Shades of green are  likely from diatoms, another type of phytoplankton. Diatoms usually  dominate the Barents Sea earlier in the year, giving way to  coccolithophores in the late summer. However, field measurements of  previous August blooms have also turned up high concentrations of  diatoms.
The Barents Sea is a shallow sea sandwiched between the coastline of  northern Russia and Scandinavia and the islands of Svalbard, Franz  Josef Land, and Novaya Zemlya. Within the shallow basin, currents  carrying warm, salty water from the Atlantic collide with currents  carrying cold, fresher water from the Arctic. During the winter, strong  winds drive the currents and mix the waters. When winter’s sea ice  retreats and light returns in the spring, diatoms thrive, typically  peaking in a large bloom in late May.
The shift between diatoms and coccolithophores occurs as the Barents  Sea changes during the summer months. Throughout summer, perpetual  light falls on the waters, gradually warming the surface. Eventually,  the ocean stratifies into layers, with warm water sitting on top of  cooler water. The diatoms deplete most of the nutrients in the surface  waters and stop growing. Coccolithophores, on the other hand, do well in  warm, nutrient-depleted water with a lot of light. In the Barents Sea,  these conditions are strongest in August.
The shifting conditions and corresponding change in species lead to  strikingly beautiful multicolored blooms such as this one. The Moderate  Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this image.
(via Phytoplankton Bloom in the Barents Sea : Natural Hazards)

to me, this is so incredibly beautiful. <3

scipsy:

In this natural-color image from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, and green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a massive phytoplankton bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every August in the Barents Sea.

The variations in color are caused by different species and concentrations of phytoplankton. The bright blue colors are probably from coccolithophores, a type of phytoplankton that is coated in a chalky shell that reflects light, turning the ocean a milky turquoise. Coccolithophores dominate the Barents Sea in August. Shades of green are likely from diatoms, another type of phytoplankton. Diatoms usually dominate the Barents Sea earlier in the year, giving way to coccolithophores in the late summer. However, field measurements of previous August blooms have also turned up high concentrations of diatoms.

The Barents Sea is a shallow sea sandwiched between the coastline of northern Russia and Scandinavia and the islands of Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, and Novaya Zemlya. Within the shallow basin, currents carrying warm, salty water from the Atlantic collide with currents carrying cold, fresher water from the Arctic. During the winter, strong winds drive the currents and mix the waters. When winter’s sea ice retreats and light returns in the spring, diatoms thrive, typically peaking in a large bloom in late May.

The shift between diatoms and coccolithophores occurs as the Barents Sea changes during the summer months. Throughout summer, perpetual light falls on the waters, gradually warming the surface. Eventually, the ocean stratifies into layers, with warm water sitting on top of cooler water. The diatoms deplete most of the nutrients in the surface waters and stop growing. Coccolithophores, on the other hand, do well in warm, nutrient-depleted water with a lot of light. In the Barents Sea, these conditions are strongest in August.

The shifting conditions and corresponding change in species lead to strikingly beautiful multicolored blooms such as this one. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this image.

(via Phytoplankton Bloom in the Barents Sea : Natural Hazards)

to me, this is so incredibly beautiful. <3

(via crookedindifference)

206 notes