For the first time in four years I am actually genuinely excited about this year’s keynote speaker at our annual global health symposium.

Unfortunately, for a school centered around, and focused on, international health our administrators have consistently shown us that they are both outdated and clueless as to what that means. I have not yet found the words to describe how incredibly frustrating that is. Last year’s speaker was painful - and offensive - if I had to pick one word to describe him it would be patriarchal.

I probably wouldn’t have even gone, but I wanted to support my peers, who often make up for what those “in charge” obliviously lack - plus I was selected to be one of the speakers myself. I am a student and I will be the very first to admit that I still have SO MUCH to learn. About everything. But I couldn’t sit down and let a bunch of wrinkly old men ruin my education and so, rather than getting pointlessly angry, I decided a while ago that I would take it into my own hands. If they wouldn’t give me the guidance I was looking for, I would find it my own damn self. And thus I found myself standing nervously behind a podium looking out over a sea of students and administrators.

I gave a talk on refugee medicine specifically focusing on several case reports to highlight the neglected public health and humanitarian issue of tuberculosis in unrecognized refugee populations within the state of Israel.

The keynote speaker gave the speech equivalent to those vomit-inducing photos of big white hands holding little black babies.   

but not this year!

I’m not speaking this year. Not because I don’t have anything to say; I have lots to say. But because it’s someone else’s turn and because this year there isn’t as big of a void that needs filling. This year we have a keynote speaker who embodies the title educator. Robert Huish is one of the most dynamic, inspiring, challenging, intelligent, thought provoking, lecturer’s I have ever met or heard and I could not be more excited that he’s flying back across the globe to visit us again this spring. 

"My last piece of advice is this simple… Persevere. Because nothing worthwhile is easy."

President Obama, in his commencement address at Barnard College today (via barackobama)

My mom said almost this exact thing to me last summer. I keep hearing her voice in my head encouraging me to keep going when I feel I can’t. Apparently Obama’s been listening to my mom too.

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California has been the most visible hotbed of student activism protesting tuition hikes and cuts to aid, so it’s fitting that another proposal for tuition-free college education comes from students in the University of California system. The Fix UC plan vows to eliminate “egregious increases in tuition costs” by allowing students to repay the cost of tuition after they have graduated in increments determined by their salaries after graduation.
The UC Student Investment Plan would make it possible for students to attend UC schools without paying any upfront costs by charging alumni a fixed 5 percent of their salaries for 20 years after graduation. Working in-state would earn a discount, as would taking a public sector job. Tuition payments from older generations would cover the costs of the younger ones. And because payments would be based on salary, no UC graduate would confront costs she could not afford.
Gary Orfield, a professor of education at University of California, Los Angeles, says Fix UC offers a promising possibility. “I do favor an option for students to pay for college by agreeing to pay a percent of future earnings,” he says, adding that the campaign should consider special circumstances “to exempt some former students and families with very low incomes and, perhaps, put some ceiling on payments.”
And if Fix UC isn’t the answer, he says, the state has an obligation to find another one. It’s unconscionable that “someone who is in the highest tenth of family income now has 10 times the chance of finishing college as someone in the lowest tenth,” he says.
(emphasis added)

California has been the most visible hotbed of student activism protesting tuition hikes and cuts to aid, so it’s fitting that another proposal for tuition-free college education comes from students in the University of California system. The Fix UC plan vows to eliminate “egregious increases in tuition costs” by allowing students to repay the cost of tuition after they have graduated in increments determined by their salaries after graduation.

The UC Student Investment Plan would make it possible for students to attend UC schools without paying any upfront costs by charging alumni a fixed 5 percent of their salaries for 20 years after graduation. Working in-state would earn a discount, as would taking a public sector job. Tuition payments from older generations would cover the costs of the younger ones. And because payments would be based on salary, no UC graduate would confront costs she could not afford.

Gary Orfield, a professor of education at University of California, Los Angeles, says Fix UC offers a promising possibility. “I do favor an option for students to pay for college by agreeing to pay a percent of future earnings,” he says, adding that the campaign should consider special circumstances “to exempt some former students and families with very low incomes and, perhaps, put some ceiling on payments.”

And if Fix UC isn’t the answer, he says, the state has an obligation to find another one. It’s unconscionable that “someone who is in the highest tenth of family income now has 10 times the chance of finishing college as someone in the lowest tenth,” he says.

(emphasis added)

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seeinnovation:

A study shows that Design Squad,  an NSF-funded public television show about engineering, improves  children’s understanding of what engineers do, as well as children’s  skills in designing processes. Here, Design Squad season two cast members Leah and  Nick brainstorm ideas with host Nate Ball and discuss their cardboard  furniture design. Photo: Anthony Tieuli

seeinnovation:

A study shows that Design Squad, an NSF-funded public television show about engineering, improves children’s understanding of what engineers do, as well as children’s skills in designing processes. Here, Design Squad season two cast members Leah and Nick brainstorm ideas with host Nate Ball and discuss their cardboard furniture design. Photo: Anthony Tieuli

“why isn’t evolution and our connection to all living things the most incredible, deeply spiritual knowledge we possess?" - my friend’s mom, who posted this photo on fb in response to yet another attack on education. 
i am grateful that i grew up surrounded by minds that asked those questions and put their energy into nurturing my education through body, mind, & spirit rather than trying to tear it down brick by brick. 

why isn’t evolution and our connection to all living things the most incredible, deeply spiritual knowledge we possess?" - my friend’s mom, who posted this photo on fb in response to yet another attack on education. 

i am grateful that i grew up surrounded by minds that asked those questions and put their energy into nurturing my education through body, mind, & spirit rather than trying to tear it down brick by brick. 

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Ignorance is no excuse.

Not just for the ignorant, but for the witnesses of ignorance as well. 

I was talking to a friend the other day. 

He’s a good person. He’s kind and compassionate and wants to help make the world a better place. We studied together in grad school. He’s also studying medicine.

He grew up in Iowa and now he’s living in California. 

We were talking about Berkeley. 

He said, “haha..but it really is a way cooler town - except all the hobos  haha

really? haha?

I recognize this isn’t something he’s familiar with. I recognize that to him these people, these “hobos” were some obnoxious eyesore unwanted in his Berkeley experience…instead of…you know…people.

I also recognize that it’s my responsibility as his friend to help him open his eyes and think critically.

What he does with that information is his own choice. I’m not going to try to tell him how to think.

But I am going to point out information and perspectives that he most likely hasn’t ever considered before, because I know him, and I know his naivety, and because I care about him, and because I care about people.

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freshphotons:

Click Source for next panel.

i used to have these educational computer games way back in the day…like dot matrix style back in the day…reading rabbit and math rabbit. i thought they were so fun. like really really. i loved doing math and spelling words and watching the little animations and the feeling of achievement when i beat each level. fortunately we didn’t have any levels as hard as the one this kid finds when you click through. 

freshphotons:

Click Source for next panel.

i used to have these educational computer games way back in the day…like dot matrix style back in the day…reading rabbit and math rabbit. i thought they were so fun. like really really. i loved doing math and spelling words and watching the little animations and the feeling of achievement when i beat each level. fortunately we didn’t have any levels as hard as the one this kid finds when you click through. 

(via freshphotons)

34 notes

areza:

Iranian Math teacher Mohammad Gheiassi still going at 72

Mohammad Gheiassi is a distinguished math teacher at Marvi high school in Tehran. He’s been teaching for 49 years now, and at 72 he is still going strong. He enjoys teaching and he breathes for it: “The nights that I know I’m going to school the next day, I’m happy. When I’m sitting at home, I’m down and feel sick. And every time that I come to class, I thank God,” Mr. Gheiassi said during an interview conducted by Fahimeh Sadat Tabatabaei.

In 1994 Mr. Gheiassi was retired, against his will. But he continued teaching even though he faces many obstacles. In one case, he had to convince the education officials that he wasn’t after getting paid and that he just wanted to do this out of his love of the profession.

He ended the interview by saying: “Why does the government think a retired person is like a dead tree? Why indeed? This is nothing but a very big weakness for the government. Why the education ministry doesn’t use the potentials of the retired teachers who are interested to teach?”

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